These Two Colleges Face Their Demise With Grace

By on November 9, 2018

“It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done.” Who said that? I think it was some dead guy from the 19th century. Charles Dickens maybe?

Iowa Wesleyan University and Valparaiso Law School both made brave decisions this week, and I salute them for it. Valparaiso Law announced it is closing after negotiations to transfer the school to Middle Tennessee State University broke down. And the President of Iowa Wesleyan University, Steven E. Titus, posted a statement on the university website candidly telling the campus community that the university faces a serious financial crisis and that the governing board is pondering the university’s future.

These decisions must have been very hard for both institutions. President Titus acknowledged that publicizing Iowa Wesleyan’s financial situation might hurt enrollment, which could hasten its demise. “But we decided it was the right thing to let people know what was going on,” Titus said. “There is risk no matter what we do.”

As for Valparaiso, the loss of its law school diminishes the reputation of the university as a whole, as a law school is generally seen as a prestige-enhancing program.

In my view, both institutions are facing the stark financial reality that many private colleges are facing, and they are facing it with courage. Let’s first look at Valparaiso.

There are far too many law schools in this country, and enrollments have been declining. As reported in , law-school enrollments have sunk from a high of 52,000 to 37,000.

The quality of students being admitted to law schools is also declining. As tracked by Law School Transparency, a nonprofit group that reports on law -school admissions, some law schools have admitted students with LSAT scores so low that half the entering class faces a very high risk of failing the bar.

Valparaiso is closing its law school, which is certainly in the public interest. It is far better for Valparaiso to close than for it to lower its admissions standards just to enroll more students.

As for Iowa Wesleyan, the school has been discounting tuition to attract students; according to one report, it has discounted tuition by more than half. At some point, that practice raises ethical issues. How can a college justify charging its least attractive students full price when the average price is less than half that amount?

And how does a college explain the discounts to the students who receive them? Some colleges have been showering first-year students with scholarships–athletic scholarships in particular. But is it honest to give an incoming student a volleyball scholarship when the school doesn’t even field a decent volleyball team?

No, Valparaiso and Iowa Western should be commended for their courage and their honesty. It was a far, far better thing they did than perhaps anything they’ve ever done. –

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About Richard Fossey

Richard Fossey is a professor at the University of Louisiana in Lafayette, Louisiana. He received his law degree from the University of Texas and his doctorate from Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is editor of Catholic Southwest, A Journal of History and Culture.

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