Questions People Ask Before They Retire

By on August 13, 2018

No matter how you look at it, retiring is a major change in your lifestyle. For many, it’s something that they’ve been looking forward to for years.

Looking forward to retirement and being ready for it are two different things. So let’s look at some of the common questions that people ask about being .

Q: What’s the most important financial question for someone preparing for retirement?

A: The most common question is, “Will I have enough income to enjoy the retired lifestyle I want?”

Most of us have worked for 40 or 50 years, and we’ve looked forward to retirement for quite awhile. Now we don’t want to be disappointed. There’s nothing worse than not having the money to visit the grandkids!

Q: How can we know to support our expected retirement lifestyle?

A: It’s easy enough to estimate your income and expenses after retirement but it does require a little math.

Begin by estimating your income from pensions, Social Security, investments, and retirement plans. Most pensions will pay you a set amount each month. The same is true with Social Security. As a rough estimate, you can expect to take about 4% of the value of your investment and retirement accounts each year as income.

Next, estimate your expenses. Historically, planners suggested that your after-retirement expenses would be about 80% of what they were pre-retirement.

More recently planners are heading away from this estimate. They recognize that today’s retirees are more active than in the past and that means that they spend more.

So they’re suggesting that you start with your current expenses, subtract expenses that will stop when you retire (work clothing, work lunches, cost to commute, etc.). Then add any new expenses (additional travel, entertainment, hobby expenses, etc.) that will begin when you retire.

If that’s too complicated just assume that your expenses will remain relatively unchanged when you retire.

READ  Here’s What You Should Know if You Were Harmed by Morgan Drexen

Q: How do you know when to begin collecting Social Security?

A: For most retirees, this is a very important and critical question. Starting to collect Social Security too soon could make your retirement budget unworkable.

You can begin any time after age 62 or as late as age 70. Each year you delay will increase your benefit by 8%. If you wait until age 70, you’ll get over 50% more than beginning at age 62.

But, that’s not the whole story. Having a bigger monthly check is great if you live long enough. Depending on when you and your spouse die, it’s possible that a smaller check started sooner will net you more.

Confusing? created by a professor who’s taken all the variables into account.

Q: What’s the biggest financial concern for baby boomers?

A: By far, it is . According to , 43% feared running out of money in retirement. It was their top fear.

Q: Most financial planners encourage people to be debt free by the time they’re 50. Why is that?

A: . For most of us, our major expenses are housing, auto, food, and debt. Ideally, by the time you’re 50, you won’t be making mortgage, auto payments, or repaying credit card debts. Without those bills, you can really boost your retirement saving!

And it’s even more important after retirement. Your post-retirement income will go much farther if the biggest expense in your monthly budget is food.

Q: Is there one easy step that I can take today to prepare for retirement?

A: Naturally I’d suggest newsletter!

The other thing I’d do is find out how much you’ll get from SS and compare that to your current expenses. Most people assume a bigger Social Security check than what they’ll actually receive. For some perspective, these are the average benefits in 2017.

READ  How Debt Is Like Drug Addiction
Beginning Age Monthly Income Annual Income
62 $1112 $13,344
66 $1383 $16,596
70 $1510 $18,120

The size of your Social Security check is dependent on your earnings history, so check sizes can vary widely. If SS is a major portion of your post-retirement income, you need to know how much you’ll be getting. You can find an answer at .

It’s no surprise, but . And that change will go much more smoothly if you’re prepared for it.

This article by Gary Foreman first appeared on and was distributed by the .

The post appeared first on .

Last step, fill out the information below or call us for Priority Assistance.

What problems are you having with your report?

Your first name is required. Your first name is required to be at least 2 characters. Your first name cannot be longer than 50 characters.
Your last name is required. Your last name is required to be at least 2 characters. Your last name cannot be longer than 50 characters.
Your email is required.
Your phone is required. Your 10 digit phone number is required.
Your state is required.
Your age is required. Your age must be greater than 18. Your age must be less than 100.

By clicking on the "Contact Me" button above, you consent, acknowledge, and agree to the following: Our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy and to receive electronic communications. We take your privacy seriously. That you are providing express "written" consent for Debt.com or appropriate service provider(s) to call you (including through automated means; e.g. autodialing, text and pre-recorded messaging) via telephone, mobile device (including SMS and MMS - charges may apply), even if your telephone number is currently listed on any internal, corporate, state or federal Do-Not-Call list. Consent is not required as a condition to utilize Debt.com services and you are under no obligation to purchase anything.

By clicking on the “Contact me” button above, you consent, acknowledge, and agree to the following: (1)That you are providing express “written” consent for Lexington Law Firm, Debt.com or appropriate service provider(s) to call you (including through automated means; e.g. autodialing, text and pre-recorded messaging) via telephone, mobile device (including SMS and MMS – charges may apply), or dialed manually, at my residential or cellular number, even if your telephone number is currently listed on any internal, corporate, state or federal Do-Not-Call list; and (2)Lexington Law’s and and Debt.com’s Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Consent is not required as a condition to utilize Lexington Law or Debt.com services and you are under no obligation to purchase anything.

About Research Department

Here is where you will find important stories located from around the web which can impact you and your financial life.
%d bloggers like this: