Betsy DeVos is Trying to Nullify a Federal Law Intended to Give Defrauded Students Relief From Student Loans: Our Government is Shielding Crooks

By on January 15, 2018

is in bed with the corrupt for-profit college industry. Her slavish pandering to the for-profit-college racketeers is truly shocking. Now she is trying to nullify a law that gives relief to students who were defrauded by for-profit colleges.

In 1994, Congress passed a law giving students an avenue for getting their student loans discharged if they were defrauded by the college they attended. The law was not used much until Corinthian Colleges–a for-profit college group–collapsed and filed for bankruptcy. At the time of its demise, Corinthian had over 300,000 students or former students; and several thousand filed so-called borrower defense applications seeking to get their student loans discharged on the grounds they were defrauded by Corinthian.

The Obama administration adopted regulations for implementing the borrower-defense rule, which provided a regulatory avenue for reviewing fraud claims. But Betsy DeVos nullified those regulations. DeVos said the Obama regulations would allow students to wrongly obtain “” at the expense of for-profit colleges.

DeVos launched a new round of administrative review, and DOE said the new regulations would probably not be implemented until 2019. The DeVos DOE’s new borrower-defense rules are very different from what the Obama administration had fashioned. In fact, the DeVos regulations, if implemented, will basically invalidate the federal borrower-defense statute altogether.

, writing in Huffington Post, observed that “the DeVos-Trump draft borrower defense rules . . . essentially nullify the 1994 law that gives former students who are ripped off by their colleges . . . the right to seek cancellation of their student loans.”

As Halperin explained, the DeVos rules erect “numerous and redundant barriers to students getting the benefit of that law.” The DeVos draft rules are so draconian that a representative of the for-profit college industry admitted that the new rules “feels a little stacked against the student.”

For example, under the rules DeVos proposes, students will have to prove their fraud claims by “clear and convincing evidence.” This is a very high legal barrier, especially when you consider that the colleges–not the complaining students–have access to the evidence of fraud.

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Of course, state attorneys general have been suing the for-profits for fraud. Surely a former student could present a judgment for fraud against a for-profit college as evidence that the student herself is a fraud victim. No, DeVos’ new regulations will not permit a fraud victim to present a judgment against a for-profit college as part of the student’s own fraud claim. As Steve Rhode wrote recently:

The proposed forgiveness plan is to eliminate any successful judgment against a school by an Attorney General as proof of deception. Instead, the individual student would have to obtain an individual judgment against the school. This would require a legal action that nearly all students would never be able to afford to file.

If the DeVos rules go into effect, fraud victims will rarely if ever obtain relief from their student loans. , an attorney with the National Consumer Law Center, said this: “I really think [the DeVos rules] would effectively do away with borrowers’ ability to get relief in almost all circumstances.”

The DeVos Department of Education’s proposed borrower-defense rules demonstrate that it has abandoned all pretense of fairness and decency toward student-loan debtors. DeVos herself is nothing more than obsequious book licker for the for-profit college industry, and Congress seems unable or unwilling to rein her in.

Last July, sued DeVos and the Department of Education, seeking to force the Department to implement the Obama-era borrower defense rules. I hope they are successful because what DeVos is essentially trying to do is eviscerate a 1994 statute passed by Congress for the express purpose of providing student fraud victims with well deserved relief from their student loans.

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About Richard Fossey

Richard Fossey is a professor at the University of Louisiana in Lafayette, Louisiana. He received his law degree from the University of Texas and his doctorate from Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is editor of Catholic Southwest, A Journal of History and Culture.

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